Visitors 31
8 photos
Manchester Corporation in order to meet the ever-growing demand for water in the expanding city and suburbs, with typical Victorian bravado and confidence dammed an existing glacial lake in the heart of the Lake District. The water level was raised and conveyed to Manchester in a 97 mile-long pipeline known as the Thirlmere Aqueduct.
The reason Thirlmere was chosen was because the northern end where the dam was constructed was a narrow gorge with high cliffs. The dam had a solid foundation, and was unconventionally narrow. This narrowness is shown on several of the photos. The dam was constructed between 1890-1894.

Categories & Keywords
Category:Architecture and Structures
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Subcategory Detail:
Keywords:1890, bosdin leech, cumbria, engineering, industrial archaeology, lake district, lakes, manchester corporation, mountains, reservoirs, thirlmere aqueduct, victorians, victorians, water supply

HRS 7070 Thirlmere and field gate

HRS 7070 Thirlmere and field gate

HRS 7071 Thirlmere looking south

HRS 7071 Thirlmere looking south

HRS 7072 Thirlmere, Manchester Corporation Waterworks plaque

HRS 7072 Thirlmere,  Manchester Corporation Waterworks plaque

HRS 7073 Thirlmere, dam and road

HRS 7073 Thirlmere, dam and road

HRS 7074 Thirlmere, dam valve house

HRS 7074 Thirlmere, dam valve house

HRS 7075 Thirlmere, dam road looking southward

HRS 7075 Thirlmere, dam road looking southward

HRS 7076 Thirlmere, dam-head

HRS 7076 Thirlmere, dam-head

HRS 7077 Thirlmere, rock-head at dam causeway looking south

HRS 7077 Thirlmere, rock-head at dam causeway looking south